Your connection to industry & member news
Your connection to industry & member news
Your connection to industry & member news  |  July 22, 2020

Place your ad in the 2021 S.C. Media Directory by Aug. 28

Now's the time to place an ad in the S.C. Press Association's annual guide to the Palmetto State's news media. The S.C. Media Directory is an important reference tool that includes detailed information on all 15 daily and 80 weekly newspapers in South Carolina. Listings include contact information, key personnel, circulation and readership, advertising information (including deadlines and mechanical requirements), listings by county, DMA info and more. The directory also includes a listing of S.C. college newspapers, radio stations, TV stations, SCPA's Associate and Individual members and commercial print providers.
A variety of ad sizes are available. Rates start as low as $150. Discounted rates are available for SCPA newspaper, collegiate, associate and individual members.
The deadline to advertise is Aug. 28. The Directory will be published in October. Find out more details.

Quote of the Week

“You must not give up. You must hold on. Tell the truth. Report the truth. Disturb the order of things. Find a way to get in the way and make a little noise with your pens, your pencils, your cameras.”

Member Spotlight: Andrew Whitaker

Here's Whitaker with Jody Pendarvis, the UFO Welcome Center guy in Bowman, S.C.. Whitaker produced a photo story about Pendarvis and his welcome center last year.
Photographer
The Post and Courier
What do you like best about your job?
One of the best parts of my job is meeting someone new every day. There isn’t a single day as a photographer for a newspaper that is the same. Along with the stories we tell. 

What is your proudest career moment?
A lot of the time we tell stories, visually or in words from people in our community and never hear from them again. Sometimes we do. The proudest moments are when we hear that our stories matter and make a difference from our community. It can be large or small, anything from a parade photo of kids in the street or a long term project that makes actual change. 
 
What's the most exciting thing going on at your paper?
One exciting thing going on here at The Post and Courier is to see growth in newspaper journalism like our expansion to Greenville and Myrtle Beach. This is exciting because while it saddens me to see papers shrinking all over, to see some growth gives me hope in local journalism. 

What’s your favorite SCPA member service?
My favorite SCPA member service is seeing the community between all the local news and collegiate papers in South Carolina. I feel we do a great job at this.

What adjustments have you made during COVID-19?
While as a photographer I still am out in the field and around people all the time I find myself always asking the safety and precautions I need while on the job. What kind of PPE do I need to have? Is this worth the image? Can I make the same photo from a safe distance? All of these have been going through my head while out on an assignment. Even outside of a pandemic, journalists should never bring harm to others or themselves.

When it’s safe to get out and about again, what are some area attractions/restaurants in your community we shouldn’t miss?
When it is safe again to dine in or just enjoy Charleston without the fear of this virus my favorite local restaurant is Harold’s Cabin. They have a unique brunch menu with my favorite – Veggies and Grits. But also I recommend catching a beautiful Lowcountry sunset or sunrise. 

What is something most people don’t know about you?
I am actually pretty open about myself even on assignment. I share a lot with the people I photograph to find connections and relations with them. But some fun facts about me are, although I proudly claim I’m from Michigan and have lived there most of my life, I have lived in seven states and was actually born in Arkansas. The others include Alabama, Kentucky, Kansas, Massachusetts and Missouri. I’m also left handed! 
 
What do you like to do outside of work?
I am rarely without my camera but love the outdoors – anything from hiking to kayaking to camping or all three. 

Anything else you'd like to share with the members?
I’m actually currently working on a photo essay about all the South Carolina newspapers. I am working on a diptych collection of the newspaper buildings here in South Carolina paired with the printed paper. Still have a lot more to visit, but it’s an ongoing personal project.

Know someone that you’d like SCPA to spotlight? Email us your recommendations.

FOI Briefs

USC chided for ignoring Title IX, sex assault FOIA query

The University of South Carolina has repeatedly ignored a routine Freedom of Information Act request from The Post and Courier asking for details if student-athletes were involved in sexual assaults, sexual misconduct or Title IX violations.
The Post and Courier on March 12 asked officials at South Carolina and Clemson for documents related to student-athletes — if any — arrested or convicted of a sexual assault, sexual misconduct or a Title IX violation from Jan. 1, 2019, to March 10, 2020.
Clemson responded on March 27 saying it had no such violations.
By Gene Sapakoff, The Post and Courier | Read more

Related: USC responds to Title IX athletics, sex assault FOIA query: No cases (By Gene Sapakoff, The Post and Courier)

People & Papers

The front office of The Holly Hill Observer and The Santee Striper was a shambles after a car slammed into the building.

Holly Hill Observer's office condemned after car crashes into building

In late May, an out-of-control car crashed into the office of The Holly Hill Observer and The Santee Striper. 
While the newspaper staffers were not injured, two people died in the crash.
The impact destroyed the front wall of the building and turned a work station into a pile of rubble. The building was immediately condemned. 
Staff will now work remotely. For news, contact News Editor Lee Hendren via email. For advertising and billing matters, contact The Advertizer-Herald office in Bamberg: (803) 245-5204 or ahpublisher@bellsouth.net. All mail should be sent to the Bamberg office, located at 369 McGee St., Bamberg, SC 29003. Phone and fax are not currently operable.

Industry Briefs

Bipartisan bill introduced that would help preserve community journalism

Thanks to all of our members who emailed, called and wrote letters our state's Congressional representatives earlier this month about supporting the Local Journalism Sustainability Act. This bipartisan bill, which helps preserve community journalism efforts, was introduced last week by Reps. Ann Kirkpatrick (D-AZ) and Dan Newhouse (R-WA), with support from several other cosponsors. Here's more about the bill.

Report for America opens newsroom applications, expands opportunity to hire more journalists

Report for America announced last week that applications are now open for news organizations interested in hosting more than 300 emerging journalists in their newsrooms for up to three years, beginning next June.
Report for America is a national service program that places talented journalists into local newsrooms to report on under-covered issues and communities. The program recruits journalists and pays half the salary, up to $20,000. The other half is split between the host news organization and local donors. Report for America is an initiative of The GroundTruth Project.
The application deadline is September 30, 2020, and newsrooms will be publicly announced in December. Attentive to the budgeting and fundraising needs of some newsrooms, an early decision will be made for those who apply by Aug. 31. Learn more and apply.

AP announces it will not capitalize W in white

The Associated Press announced Monday it will continue to lowercase the term white when used in a racial, ethnic or cultural sense. The statement comes one month after the AP changed its style to capitalize Black when used in a similar way.
AP vice president for standards John Daniszewski wrote that people who are Black share historical and cultural similarities, including discrimination based on the color of one’s skin, whereas white people across the globe do not have strong commonalities.
“We agree that white people’s skin color plays into systemic inequalities and injustices, and we want our journalism to robustly explore those problems,” wrote Daniszewski. “But capitalizing the term white, as is done by white supremacists, risks subtly conveying legitimacy to such beliefs.”
Black journalists worked privately and in public for years to capitalize the B, but it wasn’t until this summer that major American newsrooms made the switch, many following suit after the AP changed its guidelines.
Many applauded the decision, but some linguists worry about the inconsistency of capitalizing Black and not white.
By Eliana Miller, Poynter | Read more

Opinion, news or editorial? Readers often can’t tell the difference.

In print, it’s fairly clear what’s an opinion piece and what’s a news article. Online, things aren’t so clear. Confusion fuels readers’ complaints that opinions, political agendas and bias are creeping into reporters’ work.
Research has shown that a lack of labeling can lead to reader confusion. In recent years, online news outlets have begun including the word “opinion” in bold text at the top of articles, sometimes highlighted in yellow or even directly in the headline.
“In our dream world, opinion content all begins with the word ‘opinion,’ a colon and then the headline, just to make it absolutely clear,” said Joy Mayer, founder and director of Trusting News, a nonprofit helping newsrooms earn trust and credibility. “It’s the only clear word to use.”
By Eliana Miller, Poynter | Read more

Journalists are suffering mental health consequences from covering Covid-19, according to a new survey

A significant number of journalists reporting on COVID-19 show signs of anxiety and depression, according to the early results of a survey into the current state of journalists’ emotional wellbeing.
Even experienced reporters working for large, well-funded media organizations are often struggling to cope with the demands on reporting on the pandemic.
A survey by the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism and the University of Toronto asked reporters a range of questions about their work, mental health and concerns in June 2020, during a period where all countries were affected by COVID-19 in some way.
By Meera Selva and Anthony Feinstein, Reuters Institute at the University of Oxford | Read more

McClatchy submits new sale timeline to court as negotiations with Chatham

McClatchy Co. filed a new sale timeline to a federal bankruptcy court late Friday, a signal that the company has yet to reach final agreement on terms with the New Jersey hedge fund that won it at auction.
The new timeline pushes the sale proceedings into August, partially because Judge Michael E. Wiles, who is presiding over McClatchy’s case, has a full calendar until then.
“We’re continuing to work collaboratively with Chatham Asset Management on the final details of the transaction,” the company said in a statement that included few details. ...
Under the new schedule, McClatchy expects to file the agreement by July 24, which is when Wiles had originally been scheduled to approve the sale.
Because of an unrelated trial on the judge’s calendar, the date for him to approve the sale moves to Aug. 4.
The company said it does not expect the new timeline to affect the Aug. 31 deadline for the sale to close.
By Kevin G. Hall, McClatchy | Read more

Columns

By Jim Pumarlo

Are you capturing all community voices?

Minnesota is in the spotlight following the recent death of a black man during a police arrest. Racial unrest has erupted everywhere and forced all institutions and organizations – everyone –to examine attitudes toward and treatment of minorities.
It’s an opportune time for newspapers to ask: Are all of your readers’ voices represented in your coverage? 
Providing as many perspectives as possible to an issue or event should be part and parcel to everyday reporting. It’s the foundation of a well-rounded story.
The examples surface in everyday reporting. Consider a city council debating whether to give a tax break to a prospective big-box retailer. Stakeholders range from existing merchants to consumers. Are you reporting the comments solely of those at the front of the room? Are the opinions of those individuals in the back of the room – and, more broadly, residents across the community – given equal attention? Read more

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