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The Brief  
Stanford Medicine
March 2018

A Special Message from Lloyd Minor, David Entwistle, and Denny Lund
Dear Colleagues,

We live in a time of extraordinary and rapid change. Consider what was new in 2008, just 10 years ago: The Tesla Roadster, bitcoin, and the Large Hadron Collider. Far from slowing down, the pace of innovation is accelerating. How do we know? Last month, that Tesla Roadster left for outer space. We face historic challenges and unprecedented opportunities.

That is why we set out a year ago on a journey to imagine the future of Stanford Medicine. We listened, we learned, and we listened some more. Along the way, we reaffirmed our values and the unprecedented potential of our Precision Health vision. The resulting Integrated Strategic Plan includes the expertise, ideas, and wisdom of our clinical and basic science departments and all three entities that comprise Stanford Medicine. We believe it not only positions us to navigate through this period of change but to lead progress by promoting health and healing around the world. Our human-centered and discovery-led strategy has three core priorities:
Value focused
Digitally driven
Uniquely Stanford


Thank you to those who attended the town hall last week and to everyone who gave your thoughts, responded to our survey, or served on a workgroup. Your continued participation is vital because our journey is not over. Our priorities and goals must be approved by the boards of both hospitals and of the university during the spring and summer. Even then, this plan will be a living document, one that will be regularly updated, tested, and revised. The work continues as we in the Stanford Medicine community breathe life into the plan. Watch this video. 

Lloyd B. Minor, MD, Dean, Stanford University School of Medicine
David Entwistle, President and CEO, Stanford Health Care
Dennis (Denny) Lund, MD, Interim CEO and Chief Medical Officer, Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford
LPCH’s Christopher Dawes Has Retired
Credit: Stanford Children’s Health
LPCH’s Christopher Dawes Has Retired
My deepest appreciation and warmest wishes go to Christopher Dawes, who has retired as president and CEO of Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford and Stanford Children’s Health. A valued partner, Chris was a tireless champion of children everywhere and a strong supporter of Stanford Medicine. During his nearly 30 years of service he helped bring many life-saving clinical advances to our youngest patients. Read more.

Improving Electronic Health Records Must Be a Priority
Credit: Pixabay
Improving Electronic Health Records Must Be a Priority
Despite legislative mandates and billion-dollar investments, electronic health records (EHRs) continue to frustrate patients and providers alike. Not only that, but health data is often inaccessible to researchers who could use that information to help improve care. As I told Bloomberg News, we must improve EHRs and foster the machine learning approaches that have driven innovation in other industries. Read more

Credit: Steve Fisch
Match Day, Annual Rite of Passage
Three. Two. One. Open! Last week I had the pleasure of witnessing another Match Day envelope reveal, a fun, if nerve-wracking, annual ritual where our graduating medical students find out where they will complete their residency training. Congratulations to our soon-to-be doctors; we are immensely proud of you and all you’ve accomplished. To witness the shaky hands, cheers, and relieved laughter, watch this video.

Patients and Caregivers Share Their Experiences Through Storybank
Credit: Paul Sakuma
Patients and Caregivers Share Their Experiences Through Storybank
I was inspired to read about Stanford Health Care’s work with StoryCorps, which brings together patients or caregivers to share their experiences in a process that is often healing and cathartic for everyone. Through the Stanford Storybank project, Margaret McCulloch (left) and Jackie Fitzpatrick recorded their conversation about how Jackie’s breast cancer diagnosis affected their friendship. It’s one of nearly 40 stories recorded so far. Read more.

Stanford Clinical Investigators Elected into Honor Society
Credit: Norbert von der Groeben
Stanford Clinical Investigators Elected into Honor Society
Please join me in congratulating the Stanford Medicine faculty who will be inducted into the American Society for Clinical Investigation next month. Paul Bollyky (pictured), Raja Rohatgi, Mintu Turakhia, and Robert West earned acceptance for their work in infectious diseases, cell-to-cell communication, heart rhythm disorders, and the molecular drivers of tumor formation, respectively. Read more.
Stanford Launches Exome-Sequencing Program for Patients
Courtesy of the Nye family
Stanford Launches Exome-Sequencing Program for Patients
The Stanford Clinical Genomics Program now offers whole-exome sequencing and analysis, which explained why Colton and Tessa Nye (pictured) experienced frequent seizures, to all patients with undiagnosed genetic diseases. Read more.

Five Questions: Progress in Precision Health
Credit: Steve Fisch
Five Questions: Progress in Precision Health
Sam Gambhir, director of Stanford’s Precision Health and Integrated Diagnostics Center (PHIND), talks about the benefits of Precision Health for individuals and whole populations, and the challenges we must overcome. Read more.

Empathy Must Inform Science
Credit: Michael Waraksa
Empathy Must Inform Science
Soft skills such as empathy are crucial to the physician-patient relationship and underpin the Precision Health revolution, writes Dean Lloyd Minor in the winter edition of Stanford Medicine magazine. Read more.

Stanford Researchers Identify ‘Surprising’ DNA Dance
Credit: Misha Gravenor
Stanford Researchers Identify ‘Surprising’ DNA Dance
Stanford biologist Joanna Wysocka and her laboratory team devised a new way to label individual, nonrepetitive DNA sequences and made the surprising discovery that DNA twitches during transcription. Read more.

2018 ChildX Symposium
Credit: Saul Bromberger
2018 Childx Symposium
This two-day event featuring four exciting keynote speakers will gather a broad audience at the intersection of science, medicine, public policy, and health care delivery.

Thursday, April 12–Friday, April 13
Berg Hall

Learn more and register.

Human Intelligence & Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Symposium
Credit: Pixabay 
Human Intelligence & Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Symposium
As AI and machine learning remake the landscape, a series of dynamic experts will guide conversations on some of the most pressing issues in medicine today.

Tuesday, April 17
Berg Hall

Learn more and register.

2018 Stanford Drug Discovery Conference
Courtesy of Cardiovascular Institute
2018 Stanford Drug Discovery Conference
An impressive array of speakers will present advances in research and technology and discuss a broad range of topics, including policy, research, and financing.

Monday, April 23–Tuesday, April 24
Berg Hall

Learn more and register.



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